Garnet

Garnets are not a single mineral, but rather are a group of silicate minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives, and are considered to be semi-precious gemstones.

Garnets are not a single mineral, but rather are a group of silicate minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives, and are considered to be semi-precious gemstones.

The most widely-known colour of Garnet gemstones is dark red, named from the Latin ‘granatum’ meaning “seed”which refers to it’s similarity to the pomegranate seed. However, garnets come in a variety of colours and are extremely diverse. When the term “Garnet” is used, its almost always referring to garnets of the commonly recognised dark red form, while other coloured Garnets are usually given more descriptive gemstone terms.

Garnets come in many different colours including red, orange, yellow, green, purple, brown, blue, black, pink, pinkish oranges, deeply saturated purplish reds, and even colourless and they tend to have a hardness rating of 7 to 7.5 on the Mohs’ scale of mineral hardness.

In addition to being the gemstone for the 2nd wedding anniversary, Garnets are the birthstone for both the birth month of January and the birthstone for the zodiac sign of Aquarius.

Garnets are very diverse and have a wide range of symbolisms and meanings. They commonly represent trust, loyalty, independence and intellect. Garnets also posses affection, friendship, strength and healing qualities in Aquarius.

Garnets have a very interesting long history and have been commonly referred to throughout the history of religion and mankind. In Hinduism and Buddhism the semi-precious gemstone is considered a holy stone that enlightens and confers wisdom upon the wearer. In addition, archaeologists working in Egypt have discovered garnet amulets in the tombs of pharaohs and in the Ancient Persian civilisations it was claimed that the kings would only own and wear garnets.